This documentary explores the destruction of Alaska’s Tongass National Forest — and how a few people tried to stop it.

Told through the lens of three women’s personal connections to the Tongass forest and land, this documentary makes the case for why some forests are worth saving.

“Saving ancient forests is critical to both the resilience of humans and the future of our planet’s climate,” wrote the film’s staff in a statement. The Tongass National Forest spans 11 million acres and is the world’s largest intact temperate rainforest.

It’s home to a host of endangered tree, plant, and wildlife species. It’s also home to native inhabitants of Alaska. These people call Tongass home, and they don’t want that to change. The film profiles three individuals — an angler, a biologist, and an artist — who spoke up to protect the forest.

“Understory” was produced by Peak Design and Wild Confluence Media. It premieres today at 6 p.m. PST (9 p.m. EST)  and will be available for free public viewing online until Sunday, Feb. 28.

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Mary Murphy
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Mary is based out of GearJunkie’s Denver, CO office. She has a degree in English and Journalism, and been writing professionally for over four years. Her outdoor interests span from running to sport climbing, from landscape photography to pack-paddleboarding. If she’s not writing, you can most likely find her at the top of a fourteener, or in a local bakery.

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